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Cultural Sensitivity

Books

1. James Baldwin, The Fire Next Time (1993).

“At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin’s early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, the book is an intensely personal and provocative document from the iconic author of If Beale Street Could Talk and Go Tell It on the Mountain. It consists of two “letters,” written on the occasion of the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, that exhort Americans, both black and white, to attack the terrible legacy of racism. Described by The New York Times Book Review as “sermon, ultimatum, confession, deposition, testament, and chronicle…all presented in searing, brilliant prose,” The Fire Next Time stands as a classic of literature.” - Publisher

2. Ijeoma Oluo, So You Want To Talk About Race (2018).

" In [this book], Ijeoma Oluo offers a clarifying discussion of the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on the issues that divide us. Positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans, and answers the questions readers don't dare ask, like 'What is cultural appropriation?' 'Why do I keep being told to check my privilege?' and 'If I don't support affirmative action, does that make me racist?' With language that's bold, prescient, funny, and finely tuned, Oluo offers hope for a better way by showing what's possible when connections are made across the divide."--Jacket.

3. Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1999).

The autobiography of Malcolm X, Black Muslim leader and civil rights activist. Originally published in 1964.

4. Myriam E. Gilles, Risa L. Goluboff, Civil Rights Stories (2008). 

“This book provides students with a three dimensional picture of the most important cases that are addressed in civil rights courses.” - Publisher

Articles

1. Shamika Dalton and Clanitra Stewart Nejdl, Developing A Culturally Competent Legal Research Curriculum, 23 AALL Spectrum Vol. 18 (2019).

Highlights the importance of including cultural competence instruction in legal research curriculum. The article offers definitions of cultural competence and potential ways to incorporate diversity issues into law courses.

2. Karla J. Strand, DPhil, MLIS, Disrupting Whiteness in Libraries and Librarianship: A Reading List (June 2020).

This is a bibliography with resources “focused on race, racism, and disrupting whiteness and white supremacy in libraries.”

Websites

1. RACIAL EQUITY TOOLS

This website has tools, resources, and curricula to help groups and individuals address racial inequality at systemic and personal levels.

2. THE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS--LAW DEANS ANTIRACIST CLEARINGHOUSE PROJECT

This is a collection of resources and information from the Association of American Law Schools with an emphasis on five phases for U.S. law schools to engage in antiracism: listening, learning, leading, audit reporting, and iterative.

Blogs

1. African American Intellectual History Society--Black Perspectives Blog

“Black Perspectives is the award-winning blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). As engaged scholars, we are deeply committed to producing and disseminating cutting-edge research that is accessible to the public and is oriented towards advancing the lives of people of African descent and humanity. We serve as a medium to advance these critical goals.” - About page

2. UNDERSTANDING THE ADA - THE BLOG OF WILLIAM D. GOREN, J.D. LL.M.

This blog focuses on issues of accessibility and the law, especially as it relates to the American Disabilities Act. It is written by one of the foremost scholars on the ADA.

Short Videos

1. Kimberlé Crenshaw, The Urgency of Intersectionality, TED (Dec. 7, 2016), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akOe5-UsQ2o

A TED talk discussing intersectionality and the importance of addressing race and gender bias.

2. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Danger of a Single Story, TED (Oct. 7, 2009), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9Ihs241zeg&feature=youtu.be

A TED talk emphasizing the importance of listening to many stories and perspectives to increase awareness and understanding.

Organizations

1. THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION--RACIAL EQUITY IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

This website contains resources to help legal professionals address racial inequity in the justice system.

2. STRATEGIES FOR JUSTICE

“Strategies For Justice (SFJ) is a speaking and training bureau that believes unveiling untold narratives of injustice can lead to change. SFJ seeks to help communities build strategies for justice by utilizing the power of stories as a foundation for reform. We look to work with communities, organizations, and institutions of higher education with the mission to engage in civil yet meaningful dialogue. We want to make sure we are meeting the needs of your organization by enhancing the conversation on race, ability inclusion, and law enforcement.” - About Page


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